Posted tagged ‘Republican Anti-Science’

They Are Who We Thought They Were (Republicans And Their War On Our Kids)

November 11, 2014

Republican priorities are — not “becoming,” because they always were — clear. Facing the one unequivocal existential threat to the American way of life (for starters) over the next century, here’s the GOP response to the oncoming rush of human-caused global warming:

The new Republican Congress is headed for a clash with the White House over two ambitious Environmental Protection Agencyregulations that are the heart of President Obama’s climate change agenda.

Senator Mitch McConnell, the next majority leader, has already vowed to fight the rules, which could curb planet-warming carbon pollution but ultimately shut down coal-fired power plants in his native Kentucky. Mr. McConnell and other Republicans are, in the meantime, stepping up their demands that the president approve construction of the Keystone XL pipeline to carry petroleum from Canadian oil sands to refineries on the Gulf Coast.

At this point, Republicans do not have the votes to repeal the E.P.A. regulations, which will have far more impact on curbing carbon emissions than stopping the pipeline, but they say they will use their new powers to delay, defund and otherwise undermine them. Senator James M. Inhofe of Oklahoma, a prominent skeptic of climate change and the presumed new chairman of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, is expected to open investigations into the E.P.A., call for cuts in its funding and delay the regulations as long as possible.

Just to update your scorecard, here’s what the latest IPCC report confirms is at stake:

i) Risk of death, injury, ill-health, or disrupted livelihoods in low-lying coastal zones and small island developing states and other small islands, due to storm surges, coastal flooding, and sea level rise.37 [RFC 1-5]

ii) Risk of severe ill-health and disrupted livelihoods for large urban populations due to inland flooding in some regions.38 [RFC 2 and 3]

iii) Systemic risks due to extreme weather events leading to breakdown of infrastructure networks and critical services such as electricity, water supply, and health and emergency services.39 [RFC 2-4]

iv) Risk of mortality and morbidity during periods of extreme heat, particularly for vulnerable urban populations and those working outdoors in urban or rural areas.40 [RFC 2 and 3]

v) Risk of food insecurity and the breakdown of food systems linked to warming, drought, flooding, and precipitation variability and extremes, particularly for poorer populations in urban and rural settings.41 [RFC 2-4]

vi) Risk of loss of rural livelihoods and income due to insufficient access to drinking and irrigation water and reduced agricultural productivity, particularly for farmers and pastoralists with minimal capital in semi-arid regions.42 [RFC 2 and 3]

vii) Risk of loss of marine and coastal ecosystems, biodiversity, and the ecosystem goods, functions, and services they provide for coastal livelihoods, especially for fishing communities in the tropics and the Arctic.43 [RFC 1, 2, and 4]

viii) Risk of loss of terrestrial and inland water ecosystems, biodiversity, and the ecosystem goods, functions, and services they provide for livelihoods.44 [RFC 1, 3, and 4]

Many key risks constitute particular challenges for the least developed countries and vulnerable communities, given their limited ability to cope.

 

In case those near-term consequences aren’t motivation enough, consider the IPCC’s view of the longer term:

Hieronymus_Bosch_-_The_Fall_of_the_Rebel_Angels_(obverse)_-_WGA2572

Increasing magnitudes of warming increase the likelihood of severe, pervasive, and irreversible impacts. Some risks of climate change are considerable at 1 or 2°C above preindustrial levels (as shown in Assessment Box SPM.1). Global climate change risks are high to very high with global mean temperature increase of 4°C or more above preindustrial levels in all reasons for concern (Assessment Box SPM.1), and include severe and widespread impacts on unique and threatened systems, substantial species extinction, large risks to global and regional food security, and the combination of high temperature and humidity compromising normal human activities, including growing food or working outdoors in some areas for parts of the year (high confidence). The precise levels of climate change sufficient to trigger tipping points (thresholds for abrupt and irreversible change) remain uncertain, but the risk associated with crossing multiple tipping points in the earth system or in interlinked human and natural systems increases with rising temperature (medium confidence).

There is hope, or would be, given smart climate policy — really, almost any climate policy

The overall risks of climate change impacts can be reduced by limiting the rate and magnitude of climate change. Risks are reduced substantially under the assessed scenario with the lowest temperature projections (RCP2.6 – low emissions) compared to the highest temperature projections (RCP8.5 – high emissions), particularly in the second half of the 21st century (very high confidence). Reducing climate change can also reduce the scale of adaptation that might be required…

But, of course, such an approach — reducing the impact of climate change by controlling carbon emissions, while planning for a higher-carbon future —  is precisely what the Republican party has vowed to block.

My son was born in 2000.  in 2050, at the threshold of that second half of his century, he’ll face the world we make for him now.  The Republican party is conspiring with their paymasters in ways that will make his world significantly worse than the one our parents’ generation left for us.  Potentially — see Oreskes and Conway on this — it could be horrifically degraded, my son and his generation and their kids confronting catastrophic failures in the systems that make modern life go.

Obviously, this means that despite the wretched feelings that remain from last Tuesday’s debacle, we gotta keep fighting.  We need the Presidency in 2016, and as much of the Senate as we can claw back — and, perhaps more important, all those local and regional governments in which it is possible to attempt global-warming policy jurisdiction by jurisdiction.  A hard slog.  But necessary.

At the same time, I do have one question:  Why do Republicans hate their children so?

Image:  Hieronymous Bosch, Hell (the world before the flood) — panel from the Fall of thRebel Angels triptych,

Everything’s Bigger In Texas, Even The Stupid…

August 8, 2014

….hell, especially the stupid.

Exhibit ∞:   A top Texas official just announced that the state plans both to sue the EPA over its new carbon rules, and just because nullification has always worked out so well, ignore the hell out of them too [vie The Hill]:

The top environmental regulator in Texas said the state may choose not to follow the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) rules limiting carbon pollution from power plants.

At a policy event Thursday, Bryan Shaw said he is concerned the rules “are only the camel’s nose under the tent,” according to the Texas Tribune.

Edward_Lear_-_Camel_studies_-_Google_Art_Project

There are any number of ways to plumb the pure cretinism on display here, but if Mr. Shaw is really concerned about a camel proboscis poking across the line, he might want to think on this:

If Texas ignores the rules and refuses to write a plan to implement them, the EPA would have to step in and write a plan for the state.

IOW: stupid has consequences, as Texans have reason (if not apparently the willingness) to know:

Texas also ignored a 2010 federal rule requiring new industrial plants to obtain greenhouse gas permits. The EPA took over, leading to years-long delays for permits, which caused industrial interests to blame the state for its decision.

If they had Darwin awards for states…

Image:  Edward Lear, Camel Study, 1867

Bonus camel image after the jump: (more…)

Why You Should Read Eric Roston: Sarah Palin Edition.

September 25, 2008

I know we are all supposed to be burying gold in the corners of our gardens, but I’m still dealing with the grotesque implications of Sarah Palin’s apotheosis. Last night’s Katie Couric train wreck (Q:  So, Governor:  what has Maverick McCain ever done to regulate the financial markets?  A:  Katie — let me get back to you on that…) gives a hint of what we might all be in for should November 5 turn out to be an official Very Bad Day

Her rise from Alaska GOP hackdom to all the lengthening tally of the fictions that comprise the GOP presentation of its Evita – has allowed some of what makes her the worst running mate choice in history to fade into the background a bit.

That would be the substance (shurely shome mishtake? — Ed.) of what Palin actually thinks about the world in which we live.  Most important, at least from this blog’s perspective, look at the degree to which Palin’s rise to prominence ratifies the anti-science turn in the GOP from which it – and if McCain does win this election, the country too – may not recover.

Palin’s anti-science bent has been best documented through three of her positions.  Her unsurprising support for  abstinence education as the proper form of sex education for American teenagers, despite for all the evidence, some close to home, of the inadequacy of that approach, is the tell that reminds us how much damage a disdain for data and the test of reality can do.

Palin’s personal commitment to creationism is similarly not a shock, for the same reason, given her extreme religous practice (though to be fair, she has not made the teaching of creationism in school a priority in either Wasilla or Alaska at large).  It is also, for many in the science blogosphere (and the rest of the science-positive community), a sufficient lapse to make it unnecessary to look for further evidence of the danger she might pose were she to achieve power.

But in fact, at least as I see it, it is her blithe dismissal of human-induced global warming that should scare us the most.

(She has, as documented here, recanted, a bit.  In assessing her sincerity I will pass over in silence that which cannot be spoken, at least in language appropriate for a family blog.)

That is: it is pretty obvious why Palin might deny human agency here.  She is the governor of an oil and gas rich state, and she is a member of the drill-now party; both of those affiliations require placing a low weight on global warming concerns, which she duly assigns.  That’s fine, as far as it goes: she’s entitled to argue her corner, and if the other side can’t come up with more compelling arguments, shame on us, not her.

But the point is not that she says global warming doesn’t matter, or that there is nothing that can be done about it — those are genuinely arguable issues.  She’s saying that humans are completely uninvolved, that as a matter of empirical fact, the notion of human agancy to combat global warming is based on the flawed premise that the combustion of fossil fuels has something to do with climate change.

Not even the most determined of the intellectually prepared opponents of climate-change infused public policy — my own MIT colleague and global warming activist bete noire Dick Lindzen, for example – holds that view.

It is untenable.  It makes no sense.

Channeling my favorite commentator on the absurdity of life:

It is an ex-argument.

Which brings me to the point of this post, which is to commend Eric Roston’s book The Carbon Age as an antidote to the weary headache that comes from listening to absurdities proffered by the dangerously inane.

I’m not going to offer a full review here – that’s been done with gusto, as for example, here.

What I am going to say is that it is the first work on carbon and climate I have read (and I’ve read plenty, and written, long ago, one of my own) that is so neatly constructed in such a way as to combine the natural history, the science, and the tool-making ape’s transformations of carbon come together in a way that makes it possible to get in the gut why knowing all this stuff matters.

That is: Roston should be understood to have written carbon’s biography, it’s history, it’s behavior, and the implications of both when they encounter the recent and unanticipated fact of humankind’s technological evolution.

It’s a good read, a very good one — and even better, once you’re done, you will have a deep grasp of why it is both fun and essential to get to know the underlying science behind top line talking points.

And in the current context, you can’t read this book and come out thinking of Sarah Palin and the Republican Party that has embraced her anything other than either congenital or self made fools:  the kind of people who screw their eyes shut and hold their hands over their ears whilst shouting “I’M NOT LISTENING! I’M NOT LISTENING!”

As a lagniappe — the M. Python sketch referenced above can be viewed after the jump:

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