Posted tagged ‘good reads’

Self Aggrandizement Alert: Newton and the Counterfeiter’s UK Paperback is out, Critics Don’t Quail in Horror

July 29, 2010

Just got my box of paperbacks from Faber, and I have to say, I love the cover — best of the four versions to date:

The book has been well received, especially in the British press — the Sunday Times was pleased enough with it to name it on its best-books-of-the-year list, as did the Library Journal and New York magazine over here.

And now it can be bought in Britain again (Faber had a bit of an inventory control problem with the hardcover, which has been unavailable for some months.  Heck, at least I can say I sold out the British Isles…;)

And a few folks have been kind enough to re-notice the work. Via Faber’s eternally vigilant publicity folks, I learn of these props:

‘Entertaining … Levenson has a good eye for the colourful details that bring 17th-century London to life in all its grimy glory: Newton and the Counterfeiter weaves together the history of the money and a biography of one of our greatest scientists in a readable romp.’ Observer

‘Wonderful book.’ Sunday Times

Should any of this move  you to more curiosity, you can check out the work at your local bookstore, (I hope), or online at the usual suspects:  AmazonPowellsBarnes and NobleIndiebound and  across the pond at Amazon.co.ukWaterstonesBlackwells, Books Etc., and John Smith & Son — not to mention electronically Amazon’s Kindle store, the Barnes and Noble store (Not sure if it’s available yet at Apple’s ibook store, but I’ll check and update.)

Self promotion (at least thus nakedly) now at an end.  As you were.

My Contribution to Closing the Enthusiasm Gap this Fall + Some Link Love

July 28, 2010

You’ve all heard, no doubt, that the big advantage the GOP + its tinfoil auxiliaries have this fall is the reported greater enthusiasm for such goals as repealing the non-existent-but-zombie-death-panels than that felt on the Democratic side for, among much else, preventing the return to power of those that got us into our current fix.

Well, there’s lots to do about that, and what follows won’t help much.  But it won’t hurt, either.  Enjoy:

Now, some links for edification, amusement, and perhaps action.  (Don’t miss the one above — Sen. “Diaper” Dave Vitter is a source of never ending wonder.

And in partial response to Vitter’s astonishing fail, check out Atul Gawande’s latest on end-of-life care (and the consequences of the absence of such care). I plan to blog on this a little later, but don’t wait on l’il old me.   The article is essential reading.

I’ve been meaning to tout this for a while but again, as a partial response to Vitter, to the ongoing Jeremy Lord “lynchgate” fiasco, and to a whole range of shenanigans too miserable to recall here (enthusiasm gap, remember) check out Batocchio’s elegant The Five Circles of Conservative Hell.

This is a little self-aggrandizing, given how Jennifer Ouellette begins her analysis, but she’s got a lovely takedown of Amazon anonymous reviewers of science books up at Cocktail Party Physics.

Henry Farrell’s got me salivating over a novel about, among other things, the birth of linear programming.

I’m a few days behind in my reading (days?–ed.), but I would be remiss if I didn’t highlight Kathy Olmsted’s lovely reminiscence about Daniel Schorr.  It’s not the memories that stand out, in fact, as it is the critical assessment of the state of journalism, especially on TV.  Not to give it away, but there are only two cohorts:  Schorr and not-Schorr, and one is vastly different, and better, than the other.

And what would the sultry days of summer without an official celebration of Sex Week.  Carl Zimmer is on the case.

More grimly, Ed Yong, who continues to do so much work that I suspect him of being a collective of at least three symbionts occupying the same meat envelope, writes of the dangers to phytoplankton from a warming ocean.  This is fate-of-the-planet stuff.  Which is why, of course, we should return the party of global warming denialists/defeatists to power.

And with that eternal return of the same (thanks, Freddy!), I’m done for now.

That’ll do for now.

Saturday Feynman blogging

January 19, 2008

Chad Orzel over at Uncertain Principles has an “I can’t believe I hadn’t read this yet” review of Richard Feynman’s QED. He liked it, with a caveat that comes Feynman’s way a lot.

The presentation here is so elegant and seamless that it’s a little hard to imagine someone who isn’t Feynman using this book as the basis to explain the theory to someone else. If you already know a little bit about it, this can illuminate some other aspects, and provide some tricks that you could combine with pre-existing knowledge to make a good presentation, but the book alone conveys more of a sense of understanding than actual understanding.

Orzel goes on to say that he means this as high praise, and I think it is. To unpack that a little: what Feynman does give his readers is a sense of how a great scientist thinks through a very complicated idea, in language that any willing reader can grasp. It’s exhilarating

But that said, there is another book that I think is simply wonderful, better even than QED.  Check out the way too intimidatingly titled The Character of Physical Law. In it, Feynman uses the history and inner life of Newton’s law of gravitation to delve into the deep connection between mathematics and physics.

Character was a revelation to me when I first read it.  It hits the sweet spot:  Newton’s gravitation is not particularly mathematically intimidating — and Feynman deliberately chose to keep his focus there, instead of on the mathematically intense modern theory of gravity, General Relativity.

That keeps  this book from falling into the criticism Orzel makes of QED:  the reader can follow the details of argument without too much trouble.  With that hurdle removed, Feynman gave his hearers (first) and readers (now)   the satisfaction followin both the thinking and the thought embodied in Newton’s gravity.  It’s a great read.