Sunday Links

Running late — deadlines on three (3!) pieces by tomorrow at eleven at the latest.

So far I have one in draft, one that I will conjure out of another piece of writing on the same subject for a different purpose, expanding by 60% (all good stuff, no groats for fillers) and a third that is but a gleam in my eye.

Plus it’s Sunday and my son wouldn’t mind having his dad share the same spacetime coordinates with him, and nor, emphatically would his father.

So not much today, except to thank all those who listened to my appearance on Ira Flatow’s NPR TOTN:  Science Friday to discuss Newton and the Counterfeiter— and especially those who mentioned the gig beforehand on Twitter or in their blogs.  (I haven’t managed to send my personal thanks to all those in the latter group yet, but I will.)

If y’all missed it, you can hear my dulcet tones here.*

So just to demonstrate that I’m only mostly about me, and not solely, I’d like to point folks to a running series  of cool over at Daily Kos, Orinoco’s “Fundamental Understanding of Mathematics” farrago, now up to its eighteenth installment.

As long term readers of this blog know, I’m a big proponent of evangelizing the idea that injecting the most basic and simple of mathematical ideas into one’s own reasoning and into public discourse pays enormous benefits.

I’ve given a few scattered examples over the 18 months or so I’ve been writing this blog — e.g. the conversion of raw numbers into abstractions like percentages** but Orinoco, a school teacher who has taught math to young kids, is doing a wonderful job in building a systematic appreciation for both the constructs and habits of mind of mathematics accessible to just about anyone.  Highly recommended — and especially if you read through the comments where a number of math and computer geeks expand on Orinoco’s themes.  This is what I love about the internet:  spontaeneous collective creativity.

Anyway, here’s the link to diary one, and you can find the rest by navigating through Orinoco’s diary page.

*And yes, on the higher traffic day of Monday, I’ll give this another plug — I enjoyed it; I think it went well; and I’d like people to hear it.

**And yes again, I know that numbers are themselves abstractions.

Image: William-Adolphe Bouguereau, La leçon difficule (The Difficult Lesson), 1884

Explore posts in the same categories: Arithmetic, big ideas, Mathematics, navel gazing, Newton and the Counterfeiter, Self-aggrandizement

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